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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Oct 16;109 Suppl 2:17289-93. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1203167109. Epub 2012 Oct 8.

Early childhood poverty, immune-mediated disease processes, and adult productivity.

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1
Department of Policy Analysis and Management, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. kmz7@cornell.edu

Abstract

This study seeks to understand whether poverty very early in life is associated with early-onset adult conditions related to immune-mediated chronic diseases. It also tests the role that these immune-mediated chronic diseases may play in accounting for the associations between early poverty and adult productivity. Data (n = 1,070) come from the US Panel Study of Income Dynamics and include economic conditions in utero and throughout childhood and adolescence coupled with adult (age 30-41 y) self-reports of health and economic productivity. Results show that low income, particularly in very early childhood (between the prenatal and second year of life), is associated with increases in early-adult hypertension, arthritis, and limitations on activities of daily living. Moreover, these relationships and particularly arthritis partially account for the associations between early childhood poverty and adult productivity as measured by adult work hours and earnings. The results suggest that the associations between early childhood poverty and these adult disease states may be immune-mediated.

PMID:
23045664
PMCID:
PMC3477379
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1203167109
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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