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Int J Cardiol. 2013 Sep 20;168(1):243-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2012.09.087. Epub 2012 Oct 2.

Weather, pollution, and acute myocardial infarction in Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Author information

1
Division of Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Primary Care, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. wgoggins@cuhk.edu.hk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Several previous studies examined the association between acute myocardial infarction (AMI) incidence and temperature and/or air pollution. Results of these studies have been inconsistent and few studies have been done in cities with sub-tropical or tropical climates.

METHODS:

Daily data on AMI hospitalizations, mean temperature and humidity, and pollutants, were collected for 2000-2009 for three warm-climate Asian cities. Poisson Generalized Additive Models were used to regress daily AMI counts on temperature, humidity, and pollutants while controlling for day of the week, long-term trends and seasonal effects. Smoothing splines allowing non-linear associations were used for temperature and humidity while pollutants were modeled as linear terms.

RESULTS:

A 1°C drop below a threshold temperature of 24°C was significantly (p<.0001) associated with AMI hospitalization increases of 3.7% (average lag 0-13 temperature) in Hong Kong, 2.6% (average lag 0-15) in Taipei, and 4.0% (average lag 0-11) in Kaohsiung. No significant heat effects were observed. Among pollutants same day nitrogen dioxide (NO2) levels were the strongest predictors in all three cities, with a 10mg/m(3) increase in NO2 being associated with a 1.1% rise in AMI hospitalization in Hong Kong, and a 10 ppb rise being associated with 4.4% and 2.6% rises in Taipei and Kaohsiung, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Cool temperatures and higher NO2 levels substantially raised AMI risk in these warm-climate cities and the effect sizes we observed were stronger than those found in previous studies. More attention should be paid to the health dangers of cold weather in warm-climate cities.

KEYWORDS:

Acute myocardial infarction; Air pollution; Biometeorology; Temperature

PMID:
23041014
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijcard.2012.09.087
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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