Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Trends Ecol Evol. 2012 Dec;27(12):679-88. doi: 10.1016/j.tree.2012.09.003. Epub 2012 Oct 3.

Social competence: an evolutionary approach.

Author information

1
Behavioural Ecology, Institute of Ecology and Evolution, University of Bern, Hinterkappelen, Switzerland. barbara.taborsky@iee.unbe.ch

Abstract

'Social competence' refers to the ability of an individual to optimise its social behaviour depending on available social information. Although such ability will enhance social interactions and thus raise Darwinian fitness, its evolutionary and ecological significance has been largely ignored. Social competence is based on behavioural flexibility. We propose that the study of social competence requires an integrative approach that aims to understand how the brain translates social information into flexible behavioural responses, how flexibility might be constrained by the developmental history of an individual or by trade-offs with other (ecological) competences, and how social plasticity feeds back on fitness. Finally we propose a hypothesis of how social competence can become a driver of social evolution.

PMID:
23040461
DOI:
10.1016/j.tree.2012.09.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center