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Teach Learn Med. 2012;24(4):321-6. doi: 10.1080/10401334.2012.715262.

An educational intervention to increase internists' confidence with and provision of preventive services to adolescents and young adults.

Author information

1
Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. holly.gooding@childrens.harvard.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Internal medicine (IM) physicians report inadequate preparation to care for adolescents and young adults.

PURPOSE:

The aim is to (a) improve IM residents' comfort and confidence caring for adolescents/young adults and (b) increase the percentage of adolescent/young adult patients receiving preventive healthcare.

METHODS:

Fifty-two PGY1 IM residents were assigned to treatment or control groups. Residents in the treatment group interviewed and received feedback from adolescent instructors. We developed a survey to measure residents' comfort and confidence caring for adolescents/young adults and evaluated their adherence to screening guidelines for patients ages 16 to 26.

RESULTS:

Significantly more residents in the intervention group felt confident identifying sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and substance abuse and treating STIs, substance abuse, and depression compared to residents in the control group. Residents in the intervention group were no more likely to screen adolescents/young adults for Chlamydia, HIV, alcohol misuse, or depression in the 6 months following the intervention.

CONCLUSIONS:

An educational intervention utilizing adolescent instructors improves resident confidence but does not increase adherence to screening guidelines.

PMID:
23035999
DOI:
10.1080/10401334.2012.715262
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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