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Int J Eat Disord. 2012 Dec;45(8):949-56. doi: 10.1002/eat.22065. Epub 2012 Oct 4.

Comparison of specialist and nonspecialist care pathways for adolescents with anorexia nervosa and related eating disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Section of Family Therapy, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To explore the role of specialist outpatient eating disorders services and investigate how direct access to these affects rates of referral, admissions for inpatient treatment, and continuity of care.

METHOD:

Services beyond primary care in Greater London retrospectively identified adolescents who presented with an eating disorder over a 2-year period. Data concerning service use were collected from clinical casenotes.

RESULTS:

In areas where specialist outpatient services were available, 2-3 times more cases were identified than in areas without such services. Where initial outpatient treatment was in specialist rather than nonspecialist services, there was a significantly lower rate of admission for inpatient treatment and considerably higher consistency of care.

DISCUSSION:

Developing specialist outpatient services with direct access from primary care is likely to lead to improvements in treatment and reduce overall costs.

PMID:
23034735
DOI:
10.1002/eat.22065
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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