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J Microbiol Immunol Infect. 2014 Feb;47(1):63-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jmii.2012.08.018. Epub 2012 Sep 30.

Efficacy of nasal irrigation in the treatment of acute sinusitis in atopic children.

Author information

1
Division of Allergy, Asthma and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
2
Division of Allergy, Asthma and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
3
Division of Allergy, Asthma and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan. Electronic address: cshy095@csh.org.tw.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Nasal irrigation has been used as adjunctive therapy for sinonasal disease but is under-researched in children. The study aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of nasal irrigation with normal saline in the management of acute sinusitis in atopic children.

METHODS:

We enrolled 60 atopic children with acute sinusitis, of whom 29 received nasal irrigation with normal saline and 31 did not receive nasal irrigation. All participants underwent a nasal peak expiratory flow rate (nPEFR) test, a nasal smear examination, and radiography (Water's projection) and were requested to complete a Pediatric Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (PRQLQ) during the baseline visit. All participants were requested to record symptoms in a daily diary and were followed up at 1-week intervals. A physical examination, nasal smear, and nPEFR were performed at each visit, and all daily diaries were collected. At the final visit (after 3 weeks), the symptom diaries were reviewed and participants were requested to complete the PRQLQ again. nPEFR, radiography, and a nasal smear were also repeated.

RESULTS:

There were significant improvements in mean PRQLQ and nPEFR values (p < 0.05) for the irrigation compared to the non-irrigation group. There was no significant difference in radiographic findings between the groups (p > 0.05). The irrigation group recorded significant improvements in eye congestion, rhinorrhea, nasal itching, sneezing, and cough symptoms compared with the non-irrigation group.

CONCLUSION:

Nasal irrigation is an effective adjunctive treatment for acute sinusitis in atopic children.

KEYWORDS:

Acute sinusitis; Atopic children; Nasal peak expiratory flow rate; Pediatric Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality-of-Life Questionnaire

PMID:
23034126
DOI:
10.1016/j.jmii.2012.08.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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