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Sleep. 2012 Oct 1;35(10):1353-8.

Sleep duration and insulin resistance in healthy black and white adolescents.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. matthewska@upmc.edu

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

Poor sleep may play a role in insulin resistance and diabetes risk. Yet few studies of sleep and insulin resistance have focused on the important developmental period of adolescence. To address this gap, we examined the association of sleep and insulin resistance in healthy adolescents.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional.

SETTING:

Community setting in one high school.

PARTICIPANTS:

245 (137 African Americans, 116 males) high school students.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

Participants provided a fasting blood draw and kept a sleep log and wore a wrist actigraph for one week during the school year. Participants' families were from low to middle class based on family Hollingshead scores. Total sleep time across the week averaged 7.4 h by diary and 6.4 h by actigraph; homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance ([HOMA-IR] unadjusted) averaged 4.13. Linear regression analyses adjusted for age, race, gender, body mass index, and waist circumference showed that the shorter the sleep, the higher the HOMA-IR, primarily due to sleep duration during the week. No evidence was found for long sleep being associated with elevated HOMA-IR. Fragmented sleep was not associated with HOMA-IR but was associated with glucose levels.

CONCLUSIONS:

Reduced sleep duration is associated with HOMA-IR in adolescence. Long sleep duration is not associated. Interventions to extend sleep duration may reduce diabetes risk in youth.

KEYWORDS:

Sleep duration; adolescence; diabetes; insulin resistance; race

PMID:
23024433
PMCID:
PMC3443761
DOI:
10.5665/sleep.2112
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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