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J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2012 Sep-Oct;52(5):e67-73.

Improved antiretroviral refill adherence in HIV-focused community pharmacies.

Author information

1
School of Pharmacy, University of California at San Francisco, 521 Parnassus Ave., San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. cocohobaj@pharmacy.ucsf.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine differences in patient characteristics, antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen characteristics, and regimen refill adherence for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-focused pharmacy (HIV-P) versus traditional pharmacy (TP) users.

DESIGN:

Retrospective cohort study.

SETTING:

California Walgreens pharmacies from May 2007 to August 2009.

PARTICIPANTS:

HIV-positive patients with greater than 30 days of antiretroviral prescription claims.

INTERVENTION:

Deidentified prescription records for patients filling any ART prescription at any California Walgreens pharmacy during the study period were assessed.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

ART regimen refill adherence (calculated by modified medication possession ratio [mMPR]) and dichotomous measure of optimal adherence of 95% or greater.

RESULTS:

4,254 HIV-P and 11,679 TP users were included. Compared with TP users, HIV-P users traveled farther to pharmacies (5.03 vs. 1.26 miles, P < 0.01). A greater proportion of HIV-P users filled prescriptions for chronic diseases (35% vs. 30%) and received fixed-dose combination antiretroviral tablets (92% vs. 83%) (all P < 0.01). Median mMPR was higher for HIV-P users (90% vs. 77%, P < 0.0001). After adjusting for age, gender, insurance, medication use, and distance from pharmacy, use of HIV-P (odds ratio 1.90 [95% CI 1.72-2.08]) and fixed-dose combination antiretroviral tablets (3.34 [2.84-3.96]) were most strongly associated with having 95% or greater ART regimen refill adherence.

CONCLUSION:

For HIV-positive patients struggling with antiretroviral adherence, clinicians may consider minimizing pill burden with combination tablets and referral to an HIV-focused pharmacy.

PMID:
23023860
PMCID:
PMC4607273
DOI:
10.1331/JAPhA.2012.11112
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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