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Presse Med. 2012 Nov;41(11):1128-36. doi: 10.1016/j.lpm.2012.05.030. Epub 2012 Sep 27.

[Autonomic peripheral neuropathy].

[Article in French]

Author information

1
AP-HP, CHU de BicĂȘtre, service de neurologie, 94275 Le Kremlin-BicĂȘtre cedex, France. david.adams@bct.aphp.fr

Abstract

The mechanisms of dysautonomic disturbances are varied and mostly acquired. They can result from lesions of sympathetic or parasympathetic vegetative fibers located in the peripheral contingent, or in the somatic contingent by demyelination or axonal loss; or more rarely by cellular bodies in the sympathetic or parasympathetic ganglia. Several chronic peripheral neuropathies can be associated with dysautonomia. Only some causes need to be known because they can be clinically significant. Dysautonomia may be seen during chronic acquired neuropathies but also acute or subacute ones. The most frequent cause in the world is the dysautonomia of the diabetes; it affects all the systems; the cardiovascular dysfunction has an impact on the prognosis for survival when it is severe. Hereditary autonomic neuropathies are rare; they can declare themselves very early during the Riley-Day syndrome or very late during amyloid polyneuropathies due to transthyretin gene mutation. The diagnosis can be confirmed by molecular biology. The dysautonomia is frequent and often severe. These neuropathies justify symptomatic treatment to improve quality of life. For some of them, a specific treatment can be proposed to treat the causal affection to try to stop the progression of the disease.

PMID:
23021660
DOI:
10.1016/j.lpm.2012.05.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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