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J Acad Nutr Diet. 2012 Oct;112(10):1550-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jand.2012.06.369.

Dietary pattern classifications and the association with general obesity and abdominal obesity in Korean women.

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1
Chung-Ang University, Seoul, South Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study was done to identify dietary patterns and determine relationships between obesity and dietary patterns in Korean women.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

Using 3,742 cases of baseline data from the Korean Health and Genome Study, dietary patterns were identified using factor analysis of data from a validated food frequency questionnaire. Relationships between dietary patterns and obesity were analyzed.

RESULTS:

Four dietary patterns were identified: (a) "animal food" (greater intake of meats and fish), (b) "rice-vegetable" (greater intake of steamed rice, tofu, Kimchi, vegetables, dried anchovy, and seaweeds), (c) "bread-dairy" (greater intake of bread, eggs, milk, and dairy products), and (d) "noodle" (greater intake of ramyun, noodles, and Chajangmyeon). The "animal food," "bread-dairy," and "noodle" dietary patterns were preferred by younger people with higher education levels (P<0.01), but the "rice-vegetable" dietary pattern was preferred by older people with lower incomes and education levels (P<0.01). In Korean women, dietary patterns were related to abdominal obesity but not obesity. The "rice-vegetable" and "noodle" dietary patterns were associated with an increased risk of abdominal obesity. However, the "bread-dairy" dietary pattern had an inverse relationship with abdominal obesity.

CONCLUSION:

In this study we identified four unique dietary patterns in Korean women that were independently associated with abdominal obesity. Abdominal obesity was positively related to the "rice-vegetable" and "noodle" dietary patterns. These finding may be useful in the development of dietary guidelines and the prevention of abdominal obesity in Korean women.

PMID:
23017566
DOI:
10.1016/j.jand.2012.06.369
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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