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Subst Use Misuse. 2013 Jan;48(1-2):54-64. doi: 10.3109/10826084.2012.722159. Epub 2012 Sep 27.

Development of a risk reduction intervention to reduce bacterial and viral infections for injection drug users.

Author information

  • 1School of Psychological Sciences, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, Colorado 80639, USA. kristina.phillips@unco.edu

Abstract

Bacterial infections are widespread problems among drug injectors, requiring novel preventive intervention. As part of a NIDA-funded study, we developed an intervention based on the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills model, past research, injection hygiene protocols, and data collected from focus groups with 32 injectors in Denver in 2009. Qualitative responses from focus groups indicated that most participants had experienced skin abscesses and believed that bacterial infections were commonly a result of drug cut, injecting intramuscularly, and reusing needles. Access to injection supplies and experiencing withdrawal were the most frequently reported barriers to utilizing risk reduction. Implications for intervention development are discussed.

PMID:
23017057
PMCID:
PMC4868543
DOI:
10.3109/10826084.2012.722159
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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