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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1990 Jan;162(1):148-54.

Estrogen replacement therapy and the risk of endometrial cancer: remaining controversies.

Author information

1
Division of Reproductive Health, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

To examine the relationship between exogenous estrogen administration and endometrial cancer, we used data from the Cancer and Steroid Hormone Study, a multicenter, population-based case-control study. Estrogen replacement therapy for greater than or equal to 2 years was associated with an increased risk of both localized and extrauterine cancer (relative risk = 2.8, 95% confidence limits 1.6, 4.6; relative risk = 2.9, 95% confidence limits 0.9, 9.4, respectively). However, the latter finding was based on a small number of cases in which estrogen was used. Women who underwent estrogen replacement therapy for greater than or equal to 2 years had significantly elevated risks of endometrial cancer (2.1 for 2 to 5 years and 3.5 for greater than or equal to 6 years). An elevated risk persisted for greater than or equal to 6 years after discontinuation of therapy. Women who exclusively used conjugated equine estrogen preparations less than or equal to 0.625 mg had no increased risk of endometrial cancer. A history of oral contraceptive use appeared to reduce the risk of endometrial cancer associated with estrogen replacement therapy. However, these latter two potentially important findings were based on a small number of cases in which hormones were used.

PMID:
2301483
DOI:
10.1016/0002-9378(90)90838-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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