Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Vet Res. 2012 Oct;73(10):1641-9.

Evaluation of factors important in modeling plasma concentrations of tetracycline hydrochloride administered in water in swine.

Author information

1
Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606, USA. masons@campbell.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To model the plasma tetracycline concentrations in swine (Sus scrofa domestica) treated with medication administered in water and determine the factors that contribute to the most accurate predictions of measured plasma drug concentrations.

SAMPLE:

Plasma tetracycline concentrations measured in blood samples from 3 populations of swine.

PROCEDURES:

Data from previous studies provided plasma tetracycline concentrations that were measured in blood samples collected from 1 swine population at 0, 4, 8, 12, 24, 32, 48, 56, 72, 80, 96, and 104 hours and from 2 swine populations at 0, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours hours during administration of tetracycline hydrochloride dissolved in water. A 1-compartment pharmacostatistical model was used to analyze 5 potential covariate schemes and determine factors most important in predicting the plasma concentrations of tetracycline in swine.

RESULTS:

2 models most accurately predicted the tetracycline plasma concentrations in the 3 populations of swine. Factors of importance were body weight or age of pig, ambient temperature, concentration of tetracycline in water, and water use per unit of time.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

The factors found to be of importance, combined with knowledge of the individual pharmacokinetic and chemical properties of medications currently approved for administration in water, may be useful in more prudent administration of approved medications administered to swine. Factors found to be important in pharmacostatistical models may allow prediction of plasma concentrations of tetracycline or other commonly used medications administered in water. The ability to predict in vivo concentrations of medication in a population of food animals can be combined with bacterial minimum inhibitory concentrations to decrease the risk of developing antimicrobial resistance.

PMID:
23013192
DOI:
10.2460/ajvr.73.10.1641
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon
    Loading ...
    Support Center