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Ann Behav Med. 2013 Feb;45 Suppl 1:S76-85. doi: 10.1007/s12160-012-9416-z.

Aesthetic amenities and safety hazards associated with walking and bicycling for transportation in New York City.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY, USA. gl2225@columbia.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

One strategy to address health problems related to insufficient physical activity is to examine modifiable neighborhood characteristics associated with active transportation.

PURPOSE:

The aim of this study is to evaluate whether neighborhoods with more aesthetic amenities (sidewalk cafés, street trees, and clean sidewalks) and fewer safety hazards (pedestrian-auto fatalities and homicides) are associated with active transportation.

METHODS:

The 2003 Community Health Survey in New York City, which asked about active transportation (walking or bicycling >10 blocks) in the past 30 days, was linked to ZIP-code population census and built environment characteristics. Adjusted associations were estimated for dichotomous (any active transportation versus none) and continuous (trip frequency) active transportation outcomes.

RESULTS:

Among 8,034 adults, those living near sidewalk cafés were 10 % more likely to report active transportation (p = 0.01). Homicide rate was associated with less frequent active transportation among those reporting any active transportation (p = 0.002).

CONCLUSIONS:

Investments in aesthetic amenities or homicide prevention may help to promote active transportation.

PMID:
23011913
PMCID:
PMC3632298
DOI:
10.1007/s12160-012-9416-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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