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Acta Paediatr. 2013 Jan;102(1):e39-43. doi: 10.1111/apa.12033. Epub 2012 Nov 1.

Markers for severity of illness associated with decreased snoring in toddlers born ELGA.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA. kwangstarks@gmail.com

Abstract

AIM:

To describe the prevalence of paediatric sleep disordered breathing (SDB) symptoms in extremely low gestational age infants and identify neonatal risk factors, including early exposure to hypoxia and hyperoxia.

METHODS:

Patients <28 weeks gestation were monitored with high-resolution pulse oximetry. Hypoxia/hyperoxia variables were defined as percentage time of first 4 weeks of life that SaO(2) < 80% or SaO(2) > 98%, respectively. Parents completed part of the OSA-18 questionnaire for symptoms of SDB at 18-22 months. Logistic regression was used to test the association between risk factors and sleep symptoms.

RESULTS:

Of 182 patients recruited, 138 (76%) completed the questionnaire. The mean gestation was 26 weeks, and mean birth weight 887 grams. Loud snoring (21%) and restless sleep (24%) were the most prevalent symptoms. Female sex was associated with an increased risk of loud snoring (OR, 2.7; CI, 1.13-6.5). Prolonged mechanical ventilation, necrotizing enterocolitis and prolonged caffeine use, however, were inversely correlated with loud snoring. Neither neonatal hypoxia nor hyperoxia were associated with sleep symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS:

While the prevalence of sleep disordered breathing symptoms is similar to reported rates, we found a sex difference not previously reported. Interestingly, markers for severity of illness show a pattern of being protective against loud snoring.

PMID:
23009601
PMCID:
PMC3650629
DOI:
10.1111/apa.12033
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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