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J Assoc Res Otolaryngol. 2012 Dec;13(6):853-65. doi: 10.1007/s10162-012-0350-3. Epub 2012 Sep 25.

Temporal-envelope reconstruction for hearing-impaired listeners.

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1
Equipe Audition (CNRS, Universite Paris Descartes, Ecole normale superieure), Institut d'Etude de la Cognition, Ecole normale superieure, Paris Sciences et Lettres, 29 rue d'Ulm, 75005 Paris, France. lorenzi@ens.fr

Abstract

Recent studies suggest that normal-hearing listeners maintain robust speech intelligibility despite severe degradations of amplitude-modulation (AM) cues, by using temporal-envelope information recovered from broadband frequency-modulation (FM) speech cues at the output of cochlear filters. This study aimed to assess whether cochlear damage affects this capacity to reconstruct temporal-envelope information from FM. This was achieved by measuring the ability of 40 normal-hearing listeners and 41 listeners with mild-to-moderate hearing loss to identify syllables processed to degrade AM cues while leaving FM cues intact within three broad frequency bands spanning the range 65-3,645 Hz. Stimuli were presented at 65 dB SPL for both normal-hearing listeners and hearing-impaired listeners. They were presented as such or amplified using a modified half-gain rule for hearing-impaired listeners. Hearing-impaired listeners showed significantly poorer identification scores than normal-hearing listeners at both presentation levels. However, the deficit shown by hearing-impaired listeners for amplified stimuli was relatively modest. Overall, hearing-impaired data and the results of a simulation study were consistent with a poorer-than-normal ability to reconstruct temporal-envelope information resulting from a broadening of cochlear filters by a factor ranging from 2 to 4. These results suggest that mild-to-moderate cochlear hearing loss has only a modest detrimental effect on peripheral, temporal-envelope reconstruction mechanisms.

PMID:
23007719
PMCID:
PMC3505588
DOI:
10.1007/s10162-012-0350-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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