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Nat Rev Cancer. 2012 Oct;12(10):699-709. doi: 10.1038/nrc3366.

Controlling escape from angiogenesis inhibitors.

Author information

1
The UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute and Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143-0452, USA.

Abstract

Selective inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) increases the efficacy of chemotherapy and has beneficial effects on multiple advanced cancers, but response is often limited and the disease eventually progresses. Changes in the tumour microenvironment--hypoxia among them--that result from vascular pruning, suppressed angiogenesis and other consequences of VEGF inhibition can promote escape and tumour progression. New therapeutic approaches that target pathways that are involved in the escape mechanisms add the benefits of blocking tumour progression to those of slowing tumour growth by inhibiting angiogenesis.

PMID:
23001349
PMCID:
PMC3969886
DOI:
10.1038/nrc3366
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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