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Asia Pac J Public Health. 2015 Mar;27(2):NP437-47. doi: 10.1177/1010539512459750. Epub 2012 Sep 20.

The environment modifies the relationship between social networks and secondhand smoke exposure among Korean nonsmokers in Seoul and California.

Author information

1
University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA allem@usc.edu.
2
Children's Hospital Informatics Program at the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Boston, MA, USA.
3
University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
4
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
5
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.
6
Myongji University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
7
Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
8
San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA.

Abstract

This study compared risks of secondhand smoke exposure (SHSe) among Korean nonsmokers in Seoul, South Korea and California, United States. Social networks were hypothesized to contain more smokers in Seoul than in California, and smokers were hypothesized to produce more secondhand smoke in Seoul than California, as Seoul's policies and norms are less restrictive. Telephone interviews were conducted with Korean adults in Seoul (N = 500) and California (N = 2830). In all, 69% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 64-74) of Koreans and 31% (95% CI = 29-33) of Korean Americans reported any SHSe. A total of 44% (95% CI = 40-47) of Korean family members smoked versus 29% (95% CI = 28-30) of Korean American family members (t = 7.84, P < .01). A 25% to 75% increase in the proportion of family members that smoked corresponded with a 13% (95% CI = 5-21) higher probability of any SHSe among Koreans compared with 6% (95% CI = 2-10) among Korean Americans. Network interventions in combination with policies and/or health campaigns may help reduce SHSe globally.

KEYWORDS:

cross-cultural communication; global health; population health; smoke exposure; smoking/tobacco/drug abuse

PMID:
23000798
PMCID:
PMC4444048
DOI:
10.1177/1010539512459750
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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