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J Cataract Refract Surg. 2012 Oct;38(10):1833-44. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrs.2012.05.043.

Etiology of surface light scattering on hydrophobic acrylic intraocular lenses.

Author information

  • 1Alcon Research, Ltd., Fort Worth, Texas 76134, USA. marcia.ong@alconlabs.com

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To study the etiology of surface light scattering on hydrophobic acrylic intraocular lenses (IOLs).

SETTING:

Alcon Research Laboratories, Fort Worth, Texas, USA.

DESIGN:

Experimental study.

METHODS:

Intraocular lenses were obtained from clinical explantations (n = 5), from human cadavers (n = 8), and from finished-goods inventory (controls). Surface light scattering was measured and imaged with the IOLs in various hydration states (dry, short-term wetted, and long-term hydrated) before and after proteins were quantified and removed. Selected IOL samples were analyzed with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersion x-ray analysis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance, and cryogenic SEM with a focused ion beam.

RESULTS:

No inorganic deposits or organic changes were observed on any IOL surface. Under clinically relevant hydrated conditions, surface light-scattering intensity was independent of proteinaceous biofilm state (P≥.11). Instead, the hydration state of the IOLs significantly contributed to the intensity of surface light scattering (P<.001); clinically explanted and cadaver-eye IOLs (but not control IOLs) exhibited minimal scatter when dry, intermediate scatter when wetted, and maximum scatter when hydrated. Subsurface nanoglistenings with diameters less than a micron and with locations up to 120 μm from the surface of the IOLs were characterized by SEM with a focused ion beam and were identified as the source of the hydration-related surface light scattering.

CONCLUSION:

Surface light scattering on hydrophobic IOLs was predominantly caused by hydration-related subsurface nanoglistenings within the acrylic IOL material.

PMID:
22999603
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcrs.2012.05.043
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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