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Am J Public Health. 2012 Nov;102(11):2164-72. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2012.300918. Epub 2012 Sep 20.

To flourish or not: positive mental health and all-cause mortality.

Author information

1
Emory University, Department of Sociology, Room 225 Tarbutton Hall, 1555 Dickey Dr, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. ckeyes@emory.edu

Erratum in

  • Am J Public Health. 2013 May;103(5):e7-8.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We investigated whether positive mental health predicts all-cause mortality.

METHODS:

Data were from the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) study (n = 3032), which at baseline in 1995 measured positive mental health (flourishing and not) and past-year mental illness (major depressive episode, panic attacks, and generalized anxiety disorders), and linked respondents with National Death Index records in a 10-year follow-up ending in 2005. Covariates were age, gender, race, education, any past-year mental illness, smoking, physical inactivity, physical diseases, and physical disease risk factors.

RESULTS:

A total of 6.3% of participants died during the study period. The final and fully adjusted odds ratio of mortality was 1.62 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.00, 2.62; P =‚ÄČ.05) for adults who were not flourishing, relative to participants with flourishing mental health. Age, gender, race, education, smoking, physical inactivity, cardiovascular disease, and HIV/AIDS were significant predictors of death during the study period.

CONCLUSIONS:

The absence of positive mental health increased the probability of all-cause mortality for men and women at all ages after adjustment for known causes of death.

PMID:
22994191
PMCID:
PMC3477942
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2012.300918
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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