Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Br J Med Med Res. 2011;1(4):410-429.

Use of Specific IgE and Skin Prick Test to Determine Clinical Reaction Severity.

Author information

1
2351 Clay Street, Suite 380, San Francisco, CA 94115, Department of Internal Medicine, California Pacific Medical Center, California, United States.

Abstract

AIMS:

To determine whether specific IgE and skin prick test correlate better in predicting reaction severity during a double-blinded placebo controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) for egg, milk, and multiple tree nut allergens.

STUDY DESIGN:

Prospective study.

PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY:

Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, August 2009 and ongoing.

METHODOLOGY:

We examined the reaction severity of twenty-four subjects to nine possible food allergens: milk, egg, almond, cashew, hazelnut, peanut, sesame, pecan and walnut. Specific IgE and SPT were performed before each DBPCFC. DBPCFC results were classified into mild (1), moderate (2), or severe (3) reactions using a modified Bock's criteria.

RESULTS:

Twenty four subjects underwent a total of 80 DBPCFC. Eighty percent of all DBPCFCs resulted in a positive reaction. A majority, 71%, were classified as mild. No reactions occurred with a SPT of zero mm while three reactions occurred with a negative specific IgE. All reactions were reversible with medication.

CONCLUSION:

These data suggest that SPT and specific IgE levels are not associated with reaction severity (p<0.64 and 0.27, respectively). We also found that combining specific IgE and SPT improved specificity but did not help to achieve clinically useful sensitivity. For instance, an SPT > 5mm had a sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 50%. Combining SPT > 5mm and IgE > 7 resulted in a reduced sensitivity of 64%. Unexpectedly, a history of anaphylaxis 70% (n=17) was not predictive of anaphylaxis on challenge 4% (n=2).

PMID:
22993721
PMCID:
PMC3444260
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center