Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Clin Cancer Res. 2012 Dec 1;18(23):6460-8. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-12-1683. Epub 2012 Sep 18.

MRI-based liver iron content predicts for nonrelapse mortality in MDS and AML patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine I, University Hospital Carl-Gustav-Carus, Dresden, Germany. martin.wermke@uniklinikum-dresden.de

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Retrospective, surrogate marker-based studies have found inconsistent associations between systemic iron overload (SIO) and adverse outcome in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). As a consequence, the impact of SIO in this context remains under debate. The aim of this study was to test whether the objective pretransplant quantification of liver-iron content (LIC) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could circumvent these limitations and conclusively define the prognostic relevance of SIO.

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN:

The correlation between pretransplant LIC and surrogate parameters as well as the impact of SIO on posttransplant outcome was assessed within an observational study of patients (n = 88) with either myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing allo-SCT.

RESULTS:

Ferritin levels of 1,000 ng/mL or more provided only poor specificity (31.8%) for predicting elevated LIC (≥125 μmol/g) and even higher thresholds (≥2,500 ng/mL) lacked an association with nonrelapse mortality (NRM). In contrast, LIC 125 μmol/g or more was a significant risk factor for NRM in uni- and multivariate analysis (HR = 2.98; P = 0.016). Multivariate Cox-regression further showed that LIC 125 μmol/g or more was associated with a decreased overall survival (HR = 2.24, P = 0.038), whereas ferritin or transfusion burden were not.

CONCLUSIONS:

SIO reflected by LIC is an independent negative prognostic factor for posttransplant outcome in patients with AML and MDS undergoing allo-SCT. Therefore, MRI-based LIC, and not interference-prone serum markers such as ferritin, should be preferred for pretransplant risk stratification and patient selection in future clinical trials.

Comment in

PMID:
22991415
DOI:
10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-12-1683
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center