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Curr Opin Pulm Med. 2012 Nov;18(6):580-7. doi: 10.1097/MCP.0b013e328358be18.

Cognitive dysfunction and obstructive sleep apnea: from cradle to tomb.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, One University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001, USA. mgriggd@salud.unm.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

To understand clinical characteristics and risk factors for cognitive impairment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndromes.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Primary snoring increases the risk of neurocognitive impairment and lower intelligence quotients in infants and children. Middle-aged adults with severe OSA are at greater risk for cognitive impairment than young adults with apnea of equal severity. Older women with OSA are at increased risk for minimal cognitive impairment or dementia, 5 years later.

SUMMARY:

Certain age groups (younger and older) are particularly susceptible to the negative effects of OSA on cognition. Other influences that increase the risk for cognitive dysfunction in OSA include premature birth, apolipoprotein e4 allele status and other genetic polymorphisms, lower socioeconomic status, fewer years of education, and ethnicity.

PMID:
22990657
DOI:
10.1097/MCP.0b013e328358be18
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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