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Subst Abus. 2012;33(4):361-5.

Pain is not associated with worse office-based buprenorphine treatment outcomes.

Author information

1
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10467, USA. adfox@montefiore.org

Abstract

Physical pain is common among individuals seeking treatment for opioid dependence. Pain may negatively impact addiction treatment. The authors prospectively studied opioid-dependent individuals initiating office-based buprenorphine treatment, comparing buprenorphine treatment outcomes (treatment retention and opioid use) among participants with and without pain (baseline pain or persistent pain). Among 82 participants, 60% reported baseline pain and 38% reported persistent pain. Overall, treatment retention was 56% and opioid use decreased from 89% to 26% over 6 months. In multivariable analyses, the authors found no association between pain and buprenorphine treatment outcomes. Opioid-dependent individuals with and without pain can achieve similar success with buprenorphine treatment.

PMID:
22989279
PMCID:
PMC3447624
DOI:
10.1080/08897077.2011.638734
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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