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Diabetes Obes Metab. 2012 Dec;14(12):1137-44. doi: 10.1111/dom.12003. Epub 2012 Sep 25.

Modified release terbutaline (SKP1052) for hypoglycaemia prevention: a proof-of-concept study in people with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

Author information

1
Profil, Neuss, Germany.

Abstract

AIMS:

In this randomized, single blind, cross-over study 2.5 mg and 5 mg of the modified-release terbutaline formulation (SKP-1052) were compared with conventional immediate-release terbutaline (IRT, 5 mg) and placebo on overnight blood glucose (BG) and hypoglycaemia in 30 subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

METHODS:

Subjects received subcutaneous injections of insulin glargine (individualized doses) before dinner. SKP-1052, IRT or placebo was administered around 21:00 hours. BG and terbutaline concentrations were monitored overnight for 10 h post-dosing. Endpoints comprised of the nadir BG (BGn 0-10 h, primary endpoint), mean overnight BG (BGmean), morning BG (BGmorning) and hypoglycaemia rates as well as pharmacokinetic (PK) endpoints.

RESULTS:

SKP-1052 delayed release of terbutaline by 2 h [PK-tmax (mean ± SD) 5.0 ± 2.1 h (2.5 mg) and 4.7 ± 1.7 h (5 mg) vs. 2.6 ± 1.3 h with IRT, p < 0.01, respectively]. Compared with placebo, no significant differences were observed for BGn 0-10 h across treatments, but both 5 mg formulations showed less hypoglycaemic events [10 (IRT), 16 (SKP-1052) vs. 33], higher BGmean (120, 114 and 95 mg/dl) and BGmorning (126, 126 and 101 mg/dl, all comparisons p < 0.05 vs. placebo). Numerically higher BG-levels between 3 and 8 h post-dosing were observed with 2.5 mg SKP-1052 vs. placebo.

CONCLUSIONS:

Compared with IRT SKP-1052 delays release of terbutaline. 2.5 mg SKP-1052 led to numerically higher BG 3 to 8 h post-dose without fasting hyperglycaemia while 5 mg SKP-1052 resulted in fasting hyperglycaemia vs. placebo. Future studies will investigate optimized doses of SKP-1052 for nocturnal hypoglycaemia prevention.

KEYWORDS:

adverse drug reactions; diabetes complications; experimental pharmacology; glucose metabolism; insulin therapy; phase III study

PMID:
22988932
DOI:
10.1111/dom.12003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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