Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Eur Psychiatry. 2013 Jun;28(5):302-7. doi: 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2012.05.001. Epub 2012 Sep 15.

Lifetime and 12-month prevalence rates of sub-clinical psychosis symptoms in a community cohort of 50-year-old individuals.

Author information

1
Department of General and Social Psychiatry, Psychiatric University Hospital, University of Zurich, Militärstrasse 8, 8004 Zurich, Switzerland. roessler@dgsp.uzh.ch

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Estimation of prevalence rates of sub-clinical psychosis symptoms can vary considerably depending on the methodology used. Furthermore, discussions are ongoing how prevalence rates may differ across various syndromes.

METHOD:

We analyzed data from the prospective Zurich Study, assessing sub-clinical psychosis with a semi-structured clinical interview in a community cohort of 50 years old individuals. The higher-order factors of psychosis symptoms were analyzed with confirmatory factor analysis to validate the a priori specified symptom-structure. Further associations were examined with contingency tables and logistic regressions.

RESULTS:

The confirmatory factor analysis was consistent with a structure with four higher-order syndromes. Those different syndromes were labeled "thought disorder" (lifetime prevalence=10.6%), "ego disorder" (4.8%), "hallucination" (9.7%), and "schizotypy" (28.2%). A strong discrepancy was noted between the 12-month prevalence of any symptoms and those considered to be severe. Twelve-month prevalence rates of distressful syndromes ranged from 0.1% for hallucinations up to 6.6% for schizotypy. The most strongly interrelated syndromes were thought disorder and ego disorder (OR=12.4).

CONCLUSION:

Our findings indicate a continuity of sub-clinical psychosis within the general population even though only a small proportion suffers from distressing symptoms. Our analyses showed that the syndromes identified here are similar to those found in full-blown schizophrenia, albeit in an attenuated form.

PMID:
22986126
DOI:
10.1016/j.eurpsy.2012.05.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center