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Biol Psychiatry. 2012 Dec 15;72(12):997-1003. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.07.029. Epub 2012 Sep 15.

Cerebrospinal fluid neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity correlates with impulsive aggression in human subjects.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience Research Unit, Pritzker School of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. ecoccaro@bsd.uchicago.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Neurochemical studies have pointed to a modulatory role in human aggression for a number of central neurotransmitters; some (e.g., serotonin) appear to play an inhibitory role, while others (e.g., vasopressin) appear to play a facilitator role in the modulation of aggression. While recent animal studies of neuropeptide Y (NPY) have suggested a facilitator role for central NPY in the modulation of aggression, no human studies of central NPY have yet been reported regarding aggression.

METHODS:

Basal lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was obtained from 60 physically healthy subjects with personality disorder (PD) (n=40) and from healthy volunteers (n=20). These samples were then assessed for CSF NPY-like immunoreactivity (NPY-LI) and other neurotransmitter-related species in CSF and correlated with measures of aggression and impulsivity.

RESULTS:

Cerebrospinal fluid NPY-LI was higher in PD subjects compared with healthy volunteers and in subjects with intermittent explosive disorder compared with those without intermittent explosive disorder. In PD subjects, CSF NPY-LI was directly correlated with composite measures of aggression and impulsivity and a composite measure of impulsive aggression. Group differences in CSF NPY-LI concentration were accounted for by measures of impulsive aggression.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data suggest a direct relationship between CSF NPY-immunoreactivity concentration and measures of impulsive aggression in human subjects. This adds to the complex picture of the central neuromodulatory role of impulsive aggression in human subjects.

PMID:
22985695
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.07.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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