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J Occup Environ Med. 2012 Oct;54(10):1253-8. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e31825a2574.

Neurologic symptoms associated with cattle farming in the agricultural health study.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA. lvegosen@jhsph.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Infection with Campylobacter jejuni, a bacterium carried by poultry and livestock, is the most frequently identified antecedent to the autoimmune neurologic condition Guillain-Barré Syndrome. We used Agricultural Health Study data to assess whether cattle farming was associated with prevalence of neurologic symptoms.

METHODS:

Prevalence of self-reported symptoms in cattle farmers (n = 8878) was compared with farmers who did not work with animals (n = 7462), using multivariate regression.

RESULTS:

Prevalence of numbness and weakness were increased for beef and dairy farmers compared with the reference group (P < 0.0001). Of cattle farmers, 48% did not report raising other animal species, and prevalence of numbness and weakness were also increased in this subgroup compared with the reference group (P < 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS:

Occupational exposure to cattle was associated with increased prevalence of self-reported symptoms associated with peripheral neuropathy.

PMID:
22975665
PMCID:
PMC3671876
DOI:
10.1097/JOM.0b013e31825a2574
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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