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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2013 Jan;94(1):196-200. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2012.08.216. Epub 2012 Sep 11.

Changes in blood flow and cellular metabolism at a myofascial trigger point with trigger point release (ischemic compression): a proof-of-principle pilot study.

Author information

1
College of Nursing, Division of Geriatric Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA. albert.moraska@ucdenver.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To demonstrate proof-of-principle measurement for physiologic change within an active myofascial trigger point (MTrP) undergoing trigger point release (ischemic compression).

DESIGN:

Interstitial fluid was sampled continuously at a trigger point before and after intervention.

SETTING:

A biomedical research clinic at a university hospital.

PARTICIPANTS:

Subjects (N=2) from a pain clinic who had chronic headache pain.

INTERVENTIONS:

A single microdialysis catheter was inserted into an active MTrP of the upper trapezius to allow for continuous sampling of interstitial fluid before and after application of trigger point therapy by a massage therapist.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Procedural success, pain tolerance, feasibility of intervention during sample collection, and determination of physiologically relevant values for local blood flow as well as glucose and lactate concentrations.

RESULTS:

Both patients tolerated the microdialysis probe insertion into the MTrP and treatment intervention without complication. Glucose and lactate concentrations were measured in the physiologic range. After intervention, a sustained increase in lactate was noted for both subjects.

CONCLUSIONS:

Identifying physiologic constituents of MTrPs after intervention is an important step toward understanding pathophysiology and resolution of myofascial pain. The present study forwards that aim by showing that proof-of-concept for collection of interstitial fluid from an MTrP before and after intervention can be accomplished using microdialysis, thus providing methodological insight toward treatment mechanism and pain resolution. Of the biomarkers measured in this study, lactate may be the most relevant for detection and treatment of abnormalities in the MTrP.

PMID:
22975226
PMCID:
PMC3529849
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2012.08.216
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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