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J Pharm Pharm Sci. 2012;15(3):407-19.

Impact of small molecules immunosuppressants on P-glycoprotein activity and T-cell function.

Author information

1
Nephrology Department and Laboratory of Experimental Nephrology, Bellvitge University Hospital, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain. illaudo@ub.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is a member of the ABC-transporter family that transports substances across cellular membranes acting as an efflux pump extruding drugs out of the cells. Pgp plays a key role on the pharmacokinetics of several drugs. Herein, we have studied the effects of immunosuppressants on Pgp function, assessing rhodamine-123 (Rho123) uptake and efflux in different T-cell subsets.

METHODS:

Different immunosuppressants such as Cyclosporine (CsA), Rapamycin (Rapa) and Tacrolimus (Tac) were used to assess the in vitro effect on Pgp function of main T-cell subsets among healthy volunteers. We measured Rho123 uptake, efflux and kinetic of extrusion in CD4+ and CD8+ subsets by flow cytometry. Antigen-specific memory T-cell responses were assessed by measuring T-cell proliferation and cytokine secretion using an allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction.

RESULTS:

Rho123 uptake in groups treated with CsA and CsA+Rapa was significantly decreased compared to non-treated group and the other immunosupressants in both T cells subsets. Pgp activity was also reduced in CsA and CsA+Rapa compared to the other immunosupressants but it was only significant in the CsA group for CD8+ subset. Kinetic extrusion of Rho123 by Pgp in all groups was faster in CD8+ T cells. All immunosuppressants and the specific Pgp inhibitor PSC833 diminished antigen-primed T-cell proliferation, especially CD8+ T-cell subset.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data indicate that small molecules immunosuppressants, especially CsA, inhibit Pgp activity and T-cell function being the CD8+ T cells more susceptible to this effect. These findings support the importance of Pgp when designing combined immunosuppressive regimens.

PMID:
22974789
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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