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Eur J Nutr. 2013 Apr;52(3):1127-34. doi: 10.1007/s00394-012-0423-4. Epub 2012 Jul 28.

Dietary patterns and the risk of type 2 diabetes in overweight and obese individuals.

Author information

1
Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Mailbox: Str. 6.131, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Although overweight is an important determinant of diabetes risk, it remains unclear whether food choices can still influence the risk for type 2 diabetes in overweight persons. In this paper, we aim to clarify the role of dietary patterns in the development of type 2 diabetes in overweight and obese individuals.

METHODS:

We studied 20,835 overweight and obese participants in the Dutch part of the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-NL) study. Dietary intake was measured using a validated food frequency questionnaire, and dietary patterns were generated using factor analysis. Incident type 2 diabetes was verified against medical records. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between the dietary patterns (factor scores categorized in quartiles) and incident type 2 diabetes.

RESULTS:

Scoring on Pattern 1, characterized by fish, wine, chicken, raw vegetables and fruit juices, was not associated with type 2 diabetes risk after confounder adjustment. A high score on Pattern 2, characterized by soft drinks, fries and snacks, was associated with higher risk of type 2 diabetes (HR Q4 vs. Q1 (95 % CI): 1.70 (1.31; 2.20), P(trend) ≤ 0.0001), particularly among less active individuals [less active: HR Q4 vs. Q1 (95 % CI): 2.14 (1.48; 3.09), P(trend) = 0.00004, more active: HR Q4 vs. Q1 (95 % CI): 1.35 (0.93; 1.97), P(trend) = 0.01; P(interaction) = 0.02].

CONCLUSIONS:

A high score on a pattern high in soft drinks, fries and snacks and low in fruit and vegetables was associated with higher risk of type 2 diabetes in overweight and obese subjects especially among physically less active individuals.

PMID:
22972436
DOI:
10.1007/s00394-012-0423-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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