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Respir Med. 2012 Dec;106(12):1665-70. doi: 10.1016/j.rmed.2012.08.011. Epub 2012 Sep 8.

A simple method to derive speed for the endurance shuttle walk test.

Author information

1
Respiratory Medicine, West Park Healthcare Centre, 82 Buttonwood Ave, Toronto M6M 2J5, Canada. K.Hill@curtin.edu.au

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The original method for determining endurance shuttle walk test (ESWT) speed involves components that are time consuming for clinicians. We sought to determine: (i) whether components described in the original method for determining ESWT speed held true and; (ii) the agreement between speeds derived using the original method and that equivalent to 85% of the peak speed achieved during the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT).

METHODS:

Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) performed two ISWTs and one ESWT on separate days, wearing a calibrated portable gas analysis unit. A retrospective analysis of these data allowed us to determine whether: (i) the peak rate of oxygen uptake (V˙O₂peak) can be accurately estimated from the incremental shuttle walk distance (ISWD) and; (ii) ESWTs performed at a speed derived using the original method elicited 85% of V˙O₂peak. Agreement between walks speeds was determined using Bland-Altman analysis.

RESULTS:

Twenty-two participants (FEV₁ 48 ± 13% predicted, age 66 ± 8 yr) completed the study. The V˙O₂peak estimated from the ISWD was less than that measured during the ISWT (mean difference -4.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), -6.0 to -2.9 ml· kg⁻¹·min⁻¹). The ESWT and ISWT elicited similar V˙O₂peak (mean difference -0.2; 95% CI, -1.5 to 1.2 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹). The mean difference (±limits of agreement) between ESWT speeds was 0.15 (±0.34) km·h⁻¹.

CONCLUSIONS:

Components of the original method for determining the ESWT speed did not hold true in our sample. ESWT speed can be derived by calculating 85% of the peak speed achieved during the ISWT.

PMID:
22967491
DOI:
10.1016/j.rmed.2012.08.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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