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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2013 Jan;94(1):46-52. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2012.08.215. Epub 2012 Sep 7.

Home-based overnight transcutaneous capnography/pulse oximetry for diagnosing nocturnal hypoventilation associated with neuromuscular disorders.

Author information

1
Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Division, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI. krisbaum@umich.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the utility of home-based, unsupervised transcutaneous partial pressure of carbon dioxide (tc-Pco(2)) monitoring/oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry (Spo(2)) for detecting nocturnal hypoventilation (NH) in individuals with neuromuscular disorders.

DESIGN:

Retrospective case series analyzed consecutively.

SETTING:

Multidisciplinary neuromuscular respiratory failure (NMRF) clinic at an academic institution.

PARTICIPANTS:

Subjects (N=35, 68.6% men; mean age, 46.9y) with spinal cord injury (45.7%) or other neuromuscular disorders underwent overnight tests with tc-Pco(2)/Spo(2) monitoring. Fifteen (42.9%) were using nocturnal ventilatory support, either bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) or tracheostomy ventilation (TV).

INTERVENTIONS:

A respiratory therapist brought a calibrated tc-Pco(2)/Spo(2) monitor to the patient's home and provided instructions for data collection during the subject's normal sleep period. Forced vital capacity (FVC), body mass index (BMI), and exhaled end-tidal Pco(2) (ET-Pco(2)) were recorded at a clinic visit before monitoring.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Detection of NH (tc-Pco(2) ≥50mmHg for ≥5% of monitoring time). Data were also analyzed to determine whether nocturnal oxygen desaturation (Spo(2) ≤88% for ≥5% of monitoring time), FVC, BMI, or daytime ET-Pco(2) could predict the presence of NH.

RESULTS:

NH was detected in 18 subjects (51.4%), including 53.3% of those using BiPAP or TV. NH was detected in 43.8% of ventilator-independent subjects with normal daytime ET-Pco(2) (present for 49.4%±31.5% [mean ± SD] of the study period), and in 75% of subjects with an elevated daytime ET-Pco(2) (present for 92.3%±8.7% of the study period). Oxygen desaturation, BMI, and FVC were poor predictors of NH. Only 3 attempted monitoring studies failed to produce acceptable results.

CONCLUSIONS:

Home-based, unsupervised monitoring with tc-Pco(2)/Spo(2) is a useful method for diagnosing NH in NMRF.

PMID:
22964272
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2012.08.215
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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