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Fam Pract. 2013 Feb;30(1):40-7. doi: 10.1093/fampra/cms052. Epub 2012 Sep 10.

One year follow-up of patients with screen-detected metabolic syndrome in primary care: an observational study.

Author information

1
Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. c.denengelsen-2@umcutrecht.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Early detection and appropriate treatment of metabolic syndrome (MetS) can modify cardiometabolic risk factors and prevent cardiovascular disease. Optimal screening outcomes require follow-up management of MetS.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the natural course of events in the first year after positive screening for MetS in primary care with regard to follow-up behavior, medication prescription and lifestyle changes.

METHODS:

Screening of 1721 apparently healthy primary care patients (20-70 years old) detected 473 new MetS cases. These people were asked to contact their general practice for subsequent advice and treatment. Data about follow-up behavior of the screening participants and prescription of cardiovascular medication were collected from the electronic medical file, and changes in lifestyle were collected by the practice nurse.

RESULTS:

Of the 424 participants with screen-detected MetS for whom data about follow-up were available, 306 (72.2%) spontaneously contacted the practice. Antihypertensive, lipid-lowering and blood glucose-lowering medications were prescribed in 21.5%, 21.2% and 1.9% of the participants, respectively. Half of the participants for whom data about self-reported lifestyle changes were available reported to have increased their physical activity; 16.9% of the smokers quit smoking. Average weight loss was 2.1kg.

CONCLUSIONS:

Screening for MetS followed by the advice to contact the general practice for lifestyle counseling and treatment had a substantial spontaneous follow-up. Although the changes in physical activity, weight loss and smoking abstinence are promising, further research will have to demonstrate whether they are sustainable.

PMID:
22964079
DOI:
10.1093/fampra/cms052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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