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Clin Rehabil. 2013 Apr;27(4):314-24. doi: 10.1177/0269215512455651. Epub 2012 Sep 7.

Mirror therapy for patients with severe arm paresis after stroke--a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
1st European School for Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech and Language Therapy, Klinik Bavaria Kreischa, Kreischa, Germany. holm.thieme@physiotherapie-schule-kreischa.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effects of individual or group mirror therapy on sensorimotor function, activities of daily living, quality of life and visuospatial neglect in patients with a severe arm paresis after stroke.

DESIGN:

Randomized controlled trial.

SETTING:

Inpatient rehabilitation centre.

SUBJECT:

Sixty patients with a severe paresis of the arm within three months after stroke.

INTERVENTIONS:

Three groups: (1) individual mirror therapy, (2) group mirror therapy and (3) control intervention with restricted view on the affected arm.

MAIN MEASURES:

Motor function on impairment (Fugl-Meyer Test) and activity level (Action Research Arm Test), independence in activities of daily living (Barthel Index), quality of life (Stroke Impact Scale) and visuospatial neglect (Star Cancellation Test).

RESULTS:

After five weeks, no significant group differences for motor function were found (P > 0.05). Pre-post differences for the Action Research Arm Test and Fugl-Meyer Test: individual mirror therapy: 3.4 (7.1) and 3.2 (3.8), group mirror therapy: 1.1 (3.1) and 5.1 (10.0) and control therapy: 2.8 (6.7) and 5.2 (8.7). However, a significant effect on visuospatial neglect for patients in the individual mirror therapy compared to control group could be shown (P < 0.01). Furthermore, it was possible to integrate a mirror therapy group intervention for severely affected patients after stroke.

CONCLUSION:

This study showed no effect on sensorimotor function of the arm, activities of daily living and quality of life of mirror therapy compared to a control intervention after stroke. However, a positive effect on visuospatial neglect was indicated.

PMID:
22960240
DOI:
10.1177/0269215512455651
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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