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Clin Res Hepatol Gastroenterol. 2013 Apr;37(2):177-81. doi: 10.1016/j.clinre.2012.07.011. Epub 2012 Sep 7.

Pregnancy associated pancreatitis revisited.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Saint Peter's University Hospital, 254, Easton avenue, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA. uyi80@yahoo.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the demographics, risk factors and outcomes of pregnancy associated pancreatitis (PAP).

STUDY DESIGN:

A retrospective chart review was done using ICD-9 Code 577.0 (acute pancreatitis) from January 2005 through December 2009. Women aged 18 to 45 years, who were pregnant and 6 months after delivery were considered for the study. For each case, two women of the same age (± 4 years) with no history of pancreatitis were matched as control. Demographics, etiology, diagnostic modality and intervention were obtained.

RESULTS:

During the 5 years of study, 29 cases of PAP occurred among 25,600 total hospital deliveries, yielding prevalence of 0.001%: Hispanics 48%, Caucasians 24%, African Americans 17.2%, and Asian/Pacific Islanders 13% (P<0.05). Sixty-five percent of those with pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) more than 30 kg/m(2) had PAP, versus 24% with BMI between 25 and 30 kg/m(2) and 10% with BMI less than 25 kg/m(2) (P<0.05). An increasing trend of PAP was seen with gestational age and number of pregnancy.

CONCLUSION:

Gallstone disease is the most frequent etiology for PAP and tends to occur more often in Hispanics in New Jersey.

PMID:
22959401
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinre.2012.07.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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