Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Pediatr. 2013 Feb;162(2):293-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.07.047. Epub 2012 Sep 5.

Comparison of anti-Xa levels in obese and non-obese pediatric patients receiving treatment doses of enoxaparin.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacy, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if using actual body weight to dose enoxaparin in obese pediatric patients results in higher anti-Xa levels compared with non-obese pediatric patients.

STUDY DESIGN:

This was a retrospective case-matched study of obese and non-obese pediatric patients receiving treatment doses of enoxaparin in a tertiary care children's hospital. Patients were included if they were initiated on treatment doses of enoxaparin, had appropriate anti-Xa levels drawn, and were between 2 and 18 years of age. Patients with renal insufficiency, hyperbilirubinemia, goal anti-Xa level <0.5 or >1 unit/mL, or receiving mechanical circulatory support were excluded. Obese patients who met study criteria were matched on a 1:1 basis with non-obese patients.

RESULTS:

All baseline characteristics were similar except for body mass index percentile (98.2 ± 2 vs 48.7 ± 15, P < .01). Obese patients had higher initial anti-Xa levels (0.67 ± 0.27 vs 0.53 ± 0.24 unit/mL, P = .028). Over time, obese patients required a lower mean dose to achieve therapeutic anti-Xa levels than non-obese patients (0.81 ± 0.19 vs 1.1 ± 0.4 mg/kg, P = .005).

CONCLUSIONS:

The mean initial anti-Xa level was higher in obese pediatric patients compared with non-obese pediatric patients, but a dosage adjustment was not required. Obese patients may need closer monitoring over time to avoid supratherapeutic levels and possible bleeding events.

PMID:
22959138
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.07.047
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center