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PLoS Genet. 2012;8(8):e1002879. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1002879. Epub 2012 Aug 30.

Dynamic distribution of linker histone H1.5 in cellular differentiation.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Chemistry, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.

Abstract

Linker histones are essential components of chromatin, but the distributions and functions of many during cellular differentiation are not well understood. Here, we show that H1.5 binds to genic and intergenic regions, forming blocks of enrichment, in differentiated human cells from all three embryonic germ layers but not in embryonic stem cells. In differentiated cells, H1.5, but not H1.3, binds preferentially to genes that encode membrane and membrane-related proteins. Strikingly, 37% of H1.5 target genes belong to gene family clusters, groups of homologous genes that are located in proximity to each other on chromosomes. H1.5 binding is associated with gene repression and is required for SIRT1 binding, H3K9me2 enrichment, and chromatin compaction. Depletion of H1.5 results in loss of SIRT1 and H3K9me2, increased chromatin accessibility, deregulation of gene expression, and decreased cell growth. Our data reveal for the first time a specific and novel function for linker histone subtype H1.5 in maintenance of condensed chromatin at defined gene families in differentiated human cells.

PMID:
22956909
PMCID:
PMC3431313
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pgen.1002879
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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