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Adv Exp Med Biol. 2013;754:233-52. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4419-9967-2_12.

Blood-derived DNA methylation markers of cancer risk.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Dartmouth Medical School, 7650 Remsen, Hanover, NH 03755, USA. Carmen.J.Marsit@Dartmouth.edu

Abstract

The importance of somatic epigenetic alterations in tissues targeted for carcinogenesis is now well recognized and considered a key molecular step in the development of a tumor. Particularly, alteration of gene-specific and genomic DNA methylation has been extensively characterized in tumors, and has become an attractive biomarker of risk due to its specificity and stability in human samples. It also is clear that tumors do not develop as isolated phenomenon in their target tissue, but instead result from altered processes affecting not only the surrounding cells and tissues, but other organ systems, including the immune system. Thus, alterations to DNA methylation profiles detectable in peripheral blood may be useful not only in understanding the carcinogenic process and response to environmental insults, but can also provide critical insights in a systems biological view of tumorigenesis. Research to date has generally focused on how environmental exposures alter genomic DNA methylation content in peripheral blood. More recent work has begun to translate these findings to clinically useful endpoints, by defining the relationship between DNA methylation alterations and cancer risk. This chapter highlights the existing research linking the environment, blood-derived DNA methylation alterations, and cancer risk, and points out how these epigenetic alterations may be contributing fundamentally to carcinogenesis.

PMID:
22956505
DOI:
10.1007/978-1-4419-9967-2_12
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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