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Int J Sports Physiol Perform. 2013 May;8(3):254-62. Epub 2012 Sep 4.

Effects of Ramadan on the diurnal variations of repeated-sprint performances.

Author information

1
High Inst of Sport and Physical Education, University of Sfax, Sfax, Tunisia.

Erratum in

  • Int J Sports Physiol Perform. 2013 Jul;8(4):350.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study examined the effects of Ramadan on cycling repeated-sprint ability (RSA) and corresponding diurnal variations.

METHODS:

Twelve active men performed an RSA test (5 × 6-s maximal sprints interspersed with 24 s passive recovery) during morning and afternoon sessions 1 wk before Ramadan (BR), during the second (R2) and the fourth (R4) weeks of Ramadan, and 2 wk after Ramadan (AR). Maximal voluntary contraction was assessed before (MVCpre), immediately after (MVCpost), and 5 min after the RSA test (MVCpost5). Moreover, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and plasma sodium and potassium (K+) concentrations were measured at rest and after the RSA test and MVCpost.

RESULTS:

Overall, peak power (Ppeak) during the RSA test decreased throughout the 5 sprints. Ppeak measured in the first sprint and MVCpre were lower during Ramadan than BR in the afternoon (P < .05) and higher in the afternoon than the morning BR and AR (P < .05). However, this diurnal rhythmicity was not found for the last 4 sprints' Ppeak, MVCpost, and MVCpost5 in all testing periods. Furthermore, the last 4 sprints' Ppeak, MVCpost, MVCpost5, and morning MVCpre were not affected by Ramadan. [K+] measured at rest and after the RSA test and MVCpost were higher during Ramadan than BR in the afternoon (P < .05) and higher in the afternoon than the morning during Ramadan (P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Fatigability is higher in the afternoon during Ramadan, and, therefore, training and competition should be scheduled at the time of day when physical performance is less affected.

PMID:
22952200
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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