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Rev Esp Cardiol (Engl Ed). 2012 Dec;65(12):1094-100. doi: 10.1016/j.recesp.2012.05.008. Epub 2012 Aug 27.

Relationship of central and peripheral blood pressure to left ventricular mass in hypertensive patients.

[Article in English, Spanish]

Author information

1
Unidad de Hipertensión y Riesgo Vascular, Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital de Sagunto, Sagunto, Valencia, España.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship of central and peripheral blood pressure to left ventricular mass.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional study that included 392 never treated hypertensive individuals. Measurement of office, 24-h ambulatory, and central blood pressure (obtained using applanation tonometry) and determination of left ventricular mass by echocardiography were performed in all patients.

RESULTS:

In a multiple regression analysis, with adjustment for age, gender and metabolic syndrome, 24-h blood pressure was more closely related to ventricular mass than the respective office and central blood pressures. Systolic blood pressures always exhibited a higher correlation than diastolic blood pressures in all 3 determinations. The correlation between left ventricular mass index and 24-h systolic blood pressure was higher than that of office (P<.002) or central systolic blood pressures (P<.002). Changes in 24-h systolic blood pressure caused the greatest variations in left ventricular mass index (P<.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

In our population of untreated middle-aged hypertensive patients, left ventricular mass index is more closely related to 24-h ambulatory blood pressure than to office or central blood pressure. Central blood pressure does not enable us to better identify patients with left ventricular hypertrophy.

PMID:
22951089
DOI:
10.1016/j.recesp.2012.05.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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