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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2012 Sep;207(3):186.e1-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2012.06.082. Epub 2012 Jul 10.

Trends in planned early birth: a population-based study.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics, Gynaecology, and Neonatology, University of Sydney at Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to describe trends and outcomes of planned births.

STUDY DESIGN:

Data from linked birth and hospital records for 779,521 singleton births at ≥33 weeks' gestation from 2001-2009 were used to determine trends in planned births (prelabor cesarean section and labor inductions). Adverse outcomes were composite indicators of maternal and neonatal morbidity/death.

RESULTS:

From 2001-2009, there were increases in labor inductions and prelabor cesarean deliveries at <40 weeks' gestation, but no decrease in the stillbirth rate (trend P = .34). By 2009, 14.9% of live births at ≥33 weeks' gestation were prelabor cesarean deliveries before the due date; 11.4% were inductions. As planned births increased, maternal risks shifted, which included a decline in inductions with maternal hypertension from 31.9-23.9%. Earlier birth was contemporaneous with increases (trend P < .001) in neonatal and maternal morbidity rates from 3.0-3.2% and 1.1-1.5%, respectively.

CONCLUSION:

Planned birth before the due date is increasing without a contemporaneous reduction of stillbirths.

PMID:
22939720
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajog.2012.06.082
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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