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N Engl J Med. 2012 Sep 27;367(13):1198-207. Epub 2012 Sep 2.

Tiotropium in asthma poorly controlled with standard combination therapy.

Author information

1
University of Groningen and the Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Tuberculosis, University Medical Center Groningen, and Groningen Research Institute for Asthma and COPD, Groningen, The Netherlands. h.a.m.kerstjens@umcg.nl

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Some patients with asthma have frequent exacerbations and persistent airflow obstruction despite treatment with inhaled glucocorticoids and long-acting beta-agonists (LABAs).

METHODS:

In two replicate, randomized, controlled trials involving 912 patients with asthma who were receiving inhaled glucocorticoids and LABAs, we compared the effect on lung function and exacerbations of adding tiotropium (a total dose of 5 μg) or placebo, both delivered by a soft-mist inhaler once daily for 48 weeks. All the patients were symptomatic, had a post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) of 80% or less of the predicted value, and had a history of at least one severe exacerbation in the previous year.

RESULTS:

The patients had a mean baseline FEV(1) of 62% of the predicted value; the mean age was 53 years. At 24 weeks, the mean (±SE) change in the peak FEV(1) from baseline was greater with tiotropium than with placebo in the two trials: a difference of 86±34 ml in trial 1 (P=0.01) and 154±32 ml in trial 2 (P<0.001). The predose (trough) FEV(1) also improved in trials 1 and 2 with tiotropium, as compared with placebo: a difference of 88±31 ml (P=0.01) and 111±30 ml (P<0.001), respectively. The addition of tiotropium increased the time to the first severe exacerbation (282 days vs. 226 days), with an overall reduction of 21% in the risk of a severe exacerbation (hazard ratio, 0.79; P=0.03). No deaths occurred; adverse events were similar in the two groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

In patients with poorly controlled asthma despite the use of inhaled glucocorticoids and LABAs, the addition of tiotropium significantly increased the time to the first severe exacerbation and provided modest sustained bronchodilation. (Funded by Boehringer Ingelheim and Pfizer; ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT00772538 and NCT00776984.).

PMID:
22938706
DOI:
10.1056/NEJMoa1208606
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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