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J Med Assoc Thai. 2012 May;95 Suppl 5:S38-41.

Human papillomavirus infection following radiation therapy or concurrent chemoradiation for invasive cervical cancer.

Author information

1
Gynecologic Oncology Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Phramongkutklao Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. suttida@pmk.ac.th

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the prevalence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection in patients with invasive cervical cancer after treatment by concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

MATERIAL AND METHOD:

Cervicovaginal mucous samples were collected from fifty-five patients with invasive cervical cancer two months after treatment completion and tested for HPV genotypes.

RESULTS:

Of the 55 patients, 31 (56.36%) were found to be positive for HPV among these 25 (45.46%) were positive for high-risk HPV. The most common high-risk HPV found was type 16 which accounted for 35.48% (11/31) of cases. Other high-risk HPV found were types 18 (16.13%), 52 (16.13%) and 58 (12.90%). Follow-up time for patients were 3 to 22 months with mean follow-up of 13 months. In patients positive for high-risk HPV 24.00% (6/25) were found to have persistent or recurrent disease. While 30 patients negative for high-risk HPV 3.33% (1/30) were found to have persistent or recurrent disease.

CONCLUSION:

The prevalence of HPV infection in cervical cancer patients with positive high-risk HPV after treatment by radiation or concurrent chemoradiation seems to be a risk factor for persistent and recurrent disease. Testing for high-risk HPV may be a useful modality for follow-up of these patients.

PMID:
22934443
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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