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J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong). 2012 Aug;20(2):196-200.

Venous thromboembolism in Japanese patients with fractures of the pelvis and/or lower extremities using physical prophylaxis alone.

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1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Japan. tniikura@med.kobe-u.ac.jp

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To investigate the rate of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in Japanese patients with fractures of the pelvis and/or lower extremities using physical prophylaxis alone.

METHODS:

Records of 66 men and 60 women aged 15 to 95 (mean, 57) years with fractures of the pelvis and/ or lower extremities were retrospectively reviewed. They were screened for VTE based on D-dimer values. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography and/or ultrasonography were performed when the D-dimer value did not decline predictably or exceeded 20 μg/ml even 5 days after injury or surgery. Physical prophylaxis for VTE in terms of graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression were applied for all patients.

RESULTS:

Of the 126 patients, 24 were detected to have VTE (10 of 29 with multiple fractures and 14 of 97 with single fractures). Six patients were detected to have asymptomatic pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE), whereas 20 patients were detected to have deep vein thrombosis (bilaterally in 7). The rates of VTE were high in patients with multiple fractures (35%), pelvic fractures (18%), and femoral shaft fractures (50%). The rate of PTE was high in patients with pelvic fractures (12%).

CONCLUSION:

The rate of VTE in the Japanese patients was similar to that in western populations. Our screening method was useful for preventing fatal PTEs. Surgeons should be vigilant for VTE during the first 2 weeks after injury, especially in patients with multiple and pelvic fractures.

PMID:
22933678
DOI:
10.1177/230949901202000212
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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