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Methods Mol Biol. 2012;934:39-75. doi: 10.1007/978-1-62703-071-7_3.

Psychosocial job stress and immunity: a systematic review.

Author information

1
Division of Applied Research and Technology, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cincinnati, OH, USA. cji5@cdc.gov

Abstract

The purpose of this review was to provide current knowledge about the possible association between psychosocial job stress and immune parameters in blood, saliva, and urine. Using bibliographic databases (PubMed, PsychINFO, Web of Science, Medline) and the snowball method, 56 studies were found. In general, exposure to psychosocial job stress (high job demands, low job control, high job strain, job dissatisfaction, high effort-reward imbalance, overcommitment, burnout, unemployment, organizational downsizing, economic recession) had a measurable impact on immune parameters (reduced NK cell activity, NK and T cell subsets, CD4+/CD8+ ratio, and increased inflammatory markers). The evidence supports that psychosocial job stresses are related to disrupted immune responses but further research is needed to demonstrate cause-effect relationships.

PMID:
22933140
DOI:
10.1007/978-1-62703-071-7_3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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