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Acta Oncol. 2012 Sep;51(7):915-21. Epub 2012 Aug 29.

Survival of cervical cancer patients in Germany in the early 21st century: a period analysis by age, histology, and stage.

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1
Institute of Social and Family Medicine, School of Public Health, Zhejiang University , Hangzhou , China.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Population-based studies on cervical cancer providing survival estimates by age, histology, and stage have been sparse. We aimed to derive most up-to-date and detailed survival estimates for cervical cancer patients in Germany.

METHODS:

We used a pooled German national dataset including data from 11 cancer registries covering a population of 33 million people. Included were 15 685 patients diagnosed with cervical cancer from 1997 to 2006. Period analysis was performed to calculate the five-year relative survival (RS) 2002-2006. Trends in survival between 2002 and 2006 were examined using model-based period analysis. Age-adjustment was done using five age groups (15-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, and 75 + years).

RESULTS:

Overall, age-adjusted five-year relative survival in 2002-2006 was 64.7%. A strong age gradient was observed, with five-year RS decreasing from 81.7% in age group 15-49 years to 46.3% in age group 70 + years. Prognosis furthermore strongly varied by stage, with age-adjusted five-year RS reaching 84.6% for localized, 48.2% for regional, and 17.9% for distant stage. From 2002 to 2006, a significant improvement (4.7 percent units) in overall age-adjusted five-year RS was seen. The improvement was most pronounced for age groups 55-64 years (from 54.2 to 65.6%) and 65-74 years (from 50.0 to 58.1%).

CONCLUSION:

In this first comprehensive population-based study from Germany, prognosis of cervical cancer strongly varied by age and stage. Prognosis continued to improve, in particular in age range 55-74 years, in the five-year period assessed.

PMID:
22928692
DOI:
10.3109/0284186X.2012.708105
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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