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Gastrointest Endosc. 2012 Nov;76(5):927-32. doi: 10.1016/j.gie.2012.06.035. Epub 2012 Aug 21.

Pneumatic balloon dilation in pediatric achalasia: efficacy and factors predicting outcome at a single tertiary pediatric gastroenterology center.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The use of pneumatic dilation (PD) is well established in adults with achalasia; however, it is less commonly used in children.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the efficacy of PD in pediatric achalasia and to define predictive factors for its treatment failure.

DESIGN:

Single-center, prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Academic tertiary referral center.

PATIENTS:

Twenty-four patients with achalasia were enrolled from January 2004 to November 2009 and were followed for a median of 6 years.

INTERVENTION:

PD was performed with the patients under general anesthesia.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS:

Efficacy and safety of PD. Follow-up was performed by using the Eckardt score, barium swallow contrast studies, and esophageal manometry at baseline; 1, 3, and 6 months after dilation; and every year thereafter. A Cox regression model was used to identify independent predictors of failure after the first PD.

RESULTS:

The PD success rate was 67%. In 8 patients, the first PD failed, but the parents of one patient refused a second PD and requested surgery. Of the 7 patients who underwent repeated treatment, the second PD failed in 3 (43%). Overall, only 3 of the 24 patients underwent surgery (overall success rate after a maximum of 3 PDs was 87%). Multivariate analysis showed that only older age was independently associated with a higher probability of the procedure success (hazard ratio [HR] 0.66; 95% CI, 0.45-0.97).

LIMITATIONS:

Small sample size, single-center study.

CONCLUSIONS:

PD is a safe and effective technique in the management of pediatric achalasia. Young age is an independent negative predictive factor for successful clinical outcome.

PMID:
22921148
DOI:
10.1016/j.gie.2012.06.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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