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Water Res. 2012 Nov 1;46(17):5756-5764. doi: 10.1016/j.watres.2012.07.061. Epub 2012 Aug 7.

Anaerobic treatment of municipal wastewater at ambient temperature: Analysis of archaeal community structure and recovery of dissolved methane.

Author information

1
Division of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, North-13, West-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628, Japan.
2
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527, Japan.
3
Division of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, North-13, West-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628, Japan. Electronic address: qsatoh@eng.hokudai.ac.jp.
4
Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd., Aqua Development Center, 4-1-2 Ushikawadori, Toyohashi, Aichi 440-8601, Japan.

Abstract

Anaerobic treatment is an attractive option for the biological treatment of municipal wastewater. In this study, municipal wastewater was anaerobically treated with a bench-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor at temperatures from 6 to 31 °C for 18 months to investigate total chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency, archaeal community structure, and dissolved methane (D-CH(4)) recovery efficiency. The COD removal efficiency was more than 50% in summer and below 40% in winter with no evolution of biogas. Analysis of the archaeal community structures of the granular sludge from the UASB using 16S rRNA gene-cloning indicated that after microorganisms had adapted to low temperatures, the archaeal community had a lower diversity and the relative abundance of acetoclastic methanogens decreased together with an increase in hydrogenotrophic methanogens. D-CH(4), which was detected in the UASB effluent throughout the operation, could be collected with a degassing membrane. The ratio of the collection to recovery rates was 60% in summer and 100% in winter. For anaerobic treatment of municipal wastewater at lower temperatures, hydrogenotrophic methanogens play an important role in COD removal and D-CH(4) can be collected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and avoid wastage of energy resources.

PMID:
22921025
DOI:
10.1016/j.watres.2012.07.061
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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