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EuroIntervention. 2013 May 20;9(1):91-101. doi: 10.4244/EIJV9I1A14.

Classification performance of instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR) and fractional flow reserve in a clinical population of intermediate coronary stenoses: results of the ADVISE registry.

Author information

1
International Centre for Circulatory Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom. rpetraco@imperial.ac.uk

Abstract

AIMS:

To evaluate the classification agreement between instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR) and fractional flow reserve (FFR) in patients with angiographic intermediate coronary stenoses.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Three hundred and twelve patients (339 stenoses) with angiographically intermediate stenoses were included in this international clinical registry. The iFR was calculated using fully automated algorithms. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to identify the iFR optimal cut-point corresponding to FFR 0.8. The classification agreement of coronary stenoses as significant or non-significant was established between iFR and FFR and between repeated FFR measurements for each 0.05 quantile of FFR values, from 0.2 to 1. Close agreement was observed between iFR and FFR (area under ROC curve= 86%). The optimal iFR cut-off (for an FFR of 0.80) was 0.89. After adjustment for the intrinsic variability of FFR, the classification agreement (accuracy) between iFR and FFR was 94%. Amongst the stenoses classified as non-significant by iFR (>0.89) and as significant by FFR (≤0.8), 81% had associated FFR values located within the FFR "grey-zone" (0.75-0.8) and 41% within the 0.79-0.80 FFR range.

CONCLUSIONS:

In a population of intermediate coronary stenoses, the classification agreement between iFR and FFR is excellent and similar to that of repeated FFR measurements in the same sample. Vasodilator-independent assessment of intermediate stenosis seems applicable and may foster adoption of coronary physiology in the catheterisation laboratory.

PMID:
22917666
DOI:
10.4244/EIJV9I1A14
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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